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2016 Map

Take a look at our 2016 Christmas In The Village map here

The design professionals creating eye-catching tabletops in each home are from the Greater Miami Valley. Each are members of Dayton Society of Interior Designers (DSID). To learn more about DSID or to find a designer to help you in your home, go to Dayton Interior Designers.




8. 372 N. Second
Owners
Laurel and Steve Booher

Designer
Anne Rettig

Bio
Anne has been an interior designer for a very long time! From her perspective, good design has not changed, but rather, evolved over time. Anne studied both art and design. A room being a 3-D still life, the same design principles apply to a good piece of art as to a well- designed room. From a practical standpoint, her business beginnings began with window treatments, and she is still very comfortable doing those. Color choices and room arrangement currently form a core around which she is doing consulting. Ultimately making clients happy has been at the center of her philosophy. She would like to thank her many, many clients over the years, including former owners of the house she worked on for today’s show. And of course, her husband Tom deserves much thanks for his support!

Company

Anne Rettig Designs



Home History
First records found of the lot show it was owned by Elizabeth Herzanrether in 1910 and later became part of the J. W. Ford addition.
The home was built in 1946 by Hobe and Mary Massie. Steve and Laurel Booher purchased the home in 1998 and rented it out until 2011. (Tenants Michael and Shelly Viau opened the house for the 2000 Christmas Home Tour.)

Tim and Dian Thornbury rented the house during the extensive 5-year remodeling project that began in 2005. Three distinct sections were added: (1) a new garage; (2) a new sun room in the back of the house; and (3) a new master bedroom and bath on the first floor. The porch was expanded, the kitchen completely remodeled along with the basement and upstairs rooms. Steve and Laurel designed all of the landscaping and remodeling plans.

The backyard was originally part of a wide water turn-around for canal boats in the last half of the 1800s. Later the back yard became a dump. Steve redesigned the topography, planted all the landscaping and installed a small koi pond in the backyard. He, along with Tim Thornbury and Ronnie Fitch, did all of the framing and construction work on a part time basis. The detailed planning is evident in the transformation of this two bedroom one bath house to its current state.

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2. 110 S. Second
Owners
Chad and Tia Curtis
Florist
Kim Hampshire of Genell’s Flowers
Designer
Monica Harris

Bio
I am a degreed interior designer with more than 10 years of experience in the design and furniture business. For more than 10 years I have been a member of ASID and for the last several years I have been a member of DSID also. I am affiliated with numerous projects including the Dayton Philharmonic Show House, Findlay Parade of Homes and the Dayton Home and Garden Show.

Home History
The current owners of this house are Tia and Chad Curtis. The area was platted in 1847 by John Clark and Thomas Jay, the house sits on Lot # 64 (52’ by 152’). There have been many owners of Lot #64 over the years. Uriah Favorite owned the property from 1874 until 1923. The house was probably built by Uriah sometime between 1874 and 1885; 1885 is when it first showed up on the property tax evaluation. The tax evaluation indicated that the lot was valued at $780, the house at $1,750, and the barn at $50, for a total value of $2,580.

Uriah Favorite is one of the locals featured in Susan Furlong’s book, Legendary Locals of Tippecanoe to Tipp City. Uriah enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War and was a member of the Secret Service. After the war, Uriah worked at the glucose factory as a chemist, and then as its superintendent.

Despite John Clark’s preference for brick homes, the house was a wooden frame, one family home. Probably in the late 1930’s – early 1940’s, the house was sided with asbestos shingles. Sears and Roebuck began selling the shingles in 1937 – they were touted to be easy to maintain, could be painted, and were fire resistant. The house was divided into a two-family home, somewhere between 1958 and 2001.

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3. 26 E. Dow
Owners
Melanie and Chad Group
Designer
Ashley Powell

Bio
Information coming soon.

Home History

This property has had a long and varied history. In 1854, S.C. Morrison acquired the land from T. Line and Thomas Jay for the sum of $358. The existing home is believed to date from the 1860’s.

During its existence the house has had a number of owners. Wilmer Conkling Staley bought the home in 1920. His grandfather, David Staley was an early Ohio pioneer, coming to the state in 1805. In addition to being president of Amole Soap, Wilmer Staley helped establish the first paper mill in the city as well as co-publishing The Herald. His son Allen, an engineering graduate of Purdue and Yale, was a pioneer in the emergent automotive industry. Besides drawing up plans for a better steam automobile power plant, he was greatly responsible for the development of automotive air conditioning and a pioneer in turbine technology. At the time the Staley family lived at 26 East Dow, the home had a value of over $4,000, falling off dramatically when in the 1950’s it was sold for ‘$1.00 and other good and valuable considerations.’

Several intriguing stories are associated with the house. One owner is said to have been a pharmacist who dispended prescriptions from the front room. Another owner apparently owned the first motorized vehicle in Tippecanoe City. Housed in the carriage house, it was a source of fascination to neighborhood children who peeked in the windows to catch glimpses of the wonder. In the 1970’s the house was subdivided into three apartments before being converted back into a single-family home.

Current owners Chad and Melanie Group formerly lived on Dow Street and had long admired the stately house. Talking the opportunity to tour the house on a whim when it was up for sale in 2014, Melanie was immediately struck by the feeling the house was meant to be their family home. Lengthy negotiations with the bank followed and it was the day before New Year’s when they received the word their offer had been accepted.

Closing on the house in March 2015 began a seven-month process of making it into a livable dwelling. It was necessary to replace the plumbing and electrical work in addition to the heating and cooling systems. Every wall and ceiling is brand new. The original kitchen was unworkable and a new kitchen was created in the center of the home where it opens onto other rooms. An oak stairway leads upstairs where a laundry room has been added with an on-demand water system. The front room is in the process of becoming a library and office for Chad.

The property is being transformed outside as well. Scarff’s Nursery has been working with the Groups. An overgrown ash tree bordering the adjacent property has been removed and trees and shrubs added. Reseeding the lawn is planned for the spring.

Chad Group is a Tecumseh graduate and Melanie a Northmont one. First acquainted as children, they are the parents of two THS students, Cole and Alex. Settling in Tipp gave them the opportunity to be close to both their families. Starting out as a student at Wright State, family financial problems caused Melanie to drop out. Attending beauty school she discovered a vocation as a hair stylist. She has worked at Tipp’s Guys and Dolls Salon for 17 years and especially enjoys working with clients for such special occasions as prom, homecoming and weddings. Her artistic flair is shown in such projects as the dining room’s stenciling accents, her work on the home’s woodwork, the addition of a closet under the stairs and the completely renovated bathrooms.

Chad’s journey to find his vocation led him from a career in business through a time of personal family crisis to the ministry. After graduating summa cum laude from Cincinnati Christian University and being awarded a scholarship to obtain his master’s degree, he is the pastor today of the Restoration Park Church. His boyhood ambition of becoming a doctor has found fulfillment as a healer in a way he did not foresee.

The couple’s sons have been an active part of the home’s renovation. In addition to his studies, Cole plays soccer and works part time at Coldwater Café. Younger brother Alex enjoys theater, choir and playing the piano.

The Groups have stepped up to the challenge of preserving a Tipp City landmark for themselves and the community. Chad, Melanie, Cole and Alex invite you to come and take a look at the fruits of their labor!


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4. 124 N. Second
Owners
Deborah Hill
Designer
Jane Barlow

Bio
Jane Barlow has been designing for over 20 years in the Dayton, Ohio and Lousiville, Kentucky areas. In 2010, she formally established JB Adaptations. A Bachelor's in Art, from Bellarmine University, helped her develop a talent for selecting color and color combinations. She specializes in creating designs reflecting each client's unique personalities while achieving the most important part of design, functionality.

Company
JB Adaptations
Website: http://www.jbadaptations.com
Email: adaptations@yahoo.com



Home History
The land upon which this house sits was platted around 1865 and owned by R.B. Milliken. It changed hands several times over the years. We believe that in March of 1888 a house had been built and it sold to M.E. and Sarah Sprinkle. In the year 1910 the house was valued at $250.00. Over the years the house saw many families come and go.

Then in June of 1942, the home was purchased by Ernest C. and Rachel Macy. Mr. Macy had a car repair business down the street at 18 North Second St. (This historical building had once been a livery stable.) Ernest and Rachel’s son Roy Macy and wife Constance was the next generation of Macy’s to live in the house. Roy also ran the repair business that over the years was a service station selling Sunoco gas/products, a key shop and a gathering place for “Tipp’s men folk”. The Roy Macy family lived at 124 N. Second St until 1992 when Roy died.

The house again was owned by several families and then purchased by Deborah Hill in May 2016. It was advertised as having refinished hardwood floors. The kitchen had been updated with new appliances, a Corian counter top and oak cabinetry. The updated bath has a new vanity and flooring. Pella windows and doors grace the home. This 3 bedroom house has definitely received many new features.

Although Deborah hasn’t had much time to make any major changes, she has added her personal flair from her world travels. Also, vibrant colors are a trait of her personality as you can see by the purple front door.
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5. 217 N. Second
Owners
Charlotte Weideman & Chad Wellbaum
Designer
John Stuart

Bio
Coming soon.

Home History
The current owners of this house are Tia and Chad Curtis. The area was platted in 1847 by John Clark and Thomas Jay, the house sits on Lot # 64 (52’ by 152’). There have been many owners of Lot #64 over the years. Uriah Favorite owned the property from 1874 until 1923. The house was probably built by Uriah sometime between 1874 and 1885; 1885 is when it first showed up on the property tax evaluation. The tax evaluation indicated that the lot was valued at $780, the house at $1,750, and the barn at $50, for a total value of $2,580.

This solidly made home, built prior to 1898, was originally a square structure with a stone foundation and small shed in back.

What can be verified is that in 1899, Henry W. Retter (1843-1924) purchased the property from a local furniture making firm, the Tipp Building and Manufacturing Company, for $850. In 1906, Henry sold the home to his daughter Anne (1874-1951) and her husband Edward “Benjamin” Snell (1873-1932) for $1,500. Ben and Anne later sold it to George J. Smith in 1911, for $1,300.

Five years later, on July 17, 1916, Mr. and Mrs. Smith were visiting his brother Peter in Vandalia. Also visiting that day was brother Alex Smith of Bryan, Texas. Sadly, the family visit ended tragically. George and his wife were killed directly in front of Peter's farmhouse when the Dayton & Troy (D&T) Interurban hit their Saxon automobile in which they were riding, rolling the car over and over for nearly 100 feet and throwing the elderly couple to the side of the tracks.

Apparently the couple failed to hear the approaching Interurban. It is said that Peter called to George that the Interurban was coming, but was not heard.

The accident occurred near Stop 16, a half mile north of Vandalia. Alex, Peter and his wife Lucy, along with the assistance of Interurban passengers and crew carried the bodies to the barn near the house but, after a couple of hours, they succumbed to their injuries. After the accident, the home passed down to Peter and remained in the Smith family for three generations, until 1983.

Over the next three decades, the house changed hands several times from Dottie Vance (1983) Lynnette Mohler (1987), Steven Staub (1993), Fred and Sarah Gillenwater (2002), and Dennis Henson and Rita Cottrell (2004). Dennis and Rita updated the landscape with splendid perennials and exotic trees.

In 2012, Heather Bailey and Frank Scenna bought the home and replaced the dilapidated shed with a new carriage house. Walter Burton built the carriage house, which he designed to match the home’s architectural lines. Heather and Frank also updated the kitchen including a new and larger bay window, which gives a splendid view of the lovely back yard.

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6. 231 N. Second
Owners
Linda Keller
Florist
Lisa Brown
Designer
Randy Luken

Bio
Randy has owned Luken Interiors for the past 22 years. Having a Fine Arts Education he believes has been his success in the design business. He treats his design work like a piece of art creating each project as his canvas. He does residential and commercial design which helps bring variety and interest to each job. He not only does work in the Dayton area, he travels to many other States to do interior design projects. He has a showroom at his Schantz Avenue address.

Company
Luken Interiors
Website: http://www.lukeninteriors.net/


Home History
This late Victorian style home has been owned by Linda Kellar since 2012, and she is the 14th owner of the house.

Official records show the house being built in 1920, though there is other documentation that shows the house being at least from 1910. The original owner of the house was Nathan Buckles, and the house was in the Buckles family for nearly 30 years.

The kitchen has been completely remodeled, and while new and modern, it flows well into the dining room and living room. Both of those rooms have original woodwork, which has been faithfully restored.

Decorated in a traditional style, it features oak floors downstairs, pine plank floors upstairs, and natural woodwork of pine and walnut. The upstairs bathroom has also been renovated.

Enjoy your walk through this classic and beautiful Victorian style home.

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7. 310 N. Second
Owners
Mary Ann Jaros
Designer
Sharon Bledsoe

Bio
Established in 1983, her studio is in the historic Klopfer Building in Pleasant Hill. Bledsoe is a past president of the Dayton Society of Interior Designers. She participates in Show Houses and Homeramas, and speaks and writes on the subject of interior design. Projects include both new construction and historic renovation, and vary widely from city lofts to seaside homes.

Company
Sharon Bledsoe Designs
http://www.sharonbledsoe.com


Home History
The home of Mary Ann Jaros was built in 1893 and deeded to Emma Dimmet and A. M. Heckler. Other owners were Demmit, Hadlock and Sayre. The original home consisted of a living room, dining room, two bedrooms and a porch.
The home was owned by Willie and Elmer Sayre from 1962 to 1994. Elmer built the two car garage that sits on the north side of the home near the back of the lot.

Frank and Mary Ann Jaros bought the house in 1994 and Mary Ann had the porch enclosed so her husband could enjoy looking outside and enjoy nature as his health was declining. They also remodeled the kitchen and added a deck to the south side of the home.

The home is charming and beautifully decorated in "Americana". The magnificent original wooden floor boards are the perfect foundation for the decorating style of the Jaros Family.

You will enjoy the many antiques Mary Ann has tastefully used in her decor. She loves Christmas and enjoys sharing her home with us.

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1. 131 S. Second
Owners
Jill and Mike Nave
Florist
Katie Gabbard of Ivy League Florist
Designer
Abby D. Connell

Bio
Hi, I’m Abby Connell. Although I’ve been in professional interior design since 2009, I feel like I’ve had the heart of an interior designer my whole life. While other little girls played Barbie, I was the one re-decorating Barbie’s Dream House. It had so much potential, and I just had to make it perfect! Luckily, I’ve moved on from dollhouses into the world of grown-up homes. I’ve been fortunate to do what I love every day: doing interior design to make spaces a reflection of their owners. No space I design is ever the same. All my clients have unique goals, unique dreams, and unique personalities. My favorite part of my job? Making those personalities come to life through amazing interior design. My favorite compliment from a client? It’s when they say, “This room is so me!” My services include interior design planning for homes and businesses, whether the project is new construction or remodeling an existing space. From furniture to flooring, from custom window treatments to custom upholstery – I have you covered. I’ll handle every detail so all you have to worry about is when you’ll invite your friends over to show off your new space.

I feel fortunate that I’ve received recognition for my work in recent years, including 2015 Dream Room Commercial space and placing 3rd in the Dayton Home & Garden Show in 2016. While it’s always gratifying to receive awards, my most rewarding accomplishment to date is being the mom to my two sons, Braylon and Grayson.

Company
Decorating Den Interiors
adahlinghaus@decoratingden.com
Phone: 513.502.9865

Home History
Jill and Mike Nave's vernacularly styled frame home was built in 1899. Lorin Coppock (1871-1946) of the later Coppock, Lee and Rousseau funeral director business, and his wife Alice Knight Coppock were the home's first inhabitants.
The carriage house at the back of the property was constructed simultaneously. Wooden coffins were stored in the capacious loft, lowered by rope out the second story loft opening to a waiting horse-drawn conveyance below.

Mr. Coppock utilized the carriage house for his enterprise until he moved his operation to the 400 block of W. Main St. in 1918, a larger Queen Ann style home that still exists.

This South Second Street home was originally heated by a coal furnace. The raised platform for the heavy furnace still exists in the basement. The mitered window well, which served as the coal chute, is still visible on one interior basement wall.

Original floor register gratings remain in the living, dining and kitchen areas respectively. The exposed wooden flooring throughout the home is also indigenous.

The back bathroom area off the kitchen was added by the Nave's in the 1960's.

The circular portion of the front porch must have been added after 1906 as a postcard from this time does not include this feature.

Most funerals prior to 1906 took place in churches or people's private homes. Thus, the front porch addition may reflect Mr. Coppock's creation of a mourner's seating area outside when the home doubled as a residence and a funeral parlor.

The home was sold to the Leonard family at the end of WWI. The Leonards and their children continued to own the property until 1955.

Martha Hoover sold the home to Julian and Joyce Nave on August 9, 1967. The Naves and their porogeny have lived in the house ever since.

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9. Trophy Nut
BONUS TOUR STOP

Home History
The two story federalist styled facade building at 320 North Second Street in Tipp City, Ohio currently houses Trophy Nut Company, a national nut processing and packaging company. The red brick building flanks the bed of the old Miami and Erie Canal.

The origins of this building go back to the mid nineteenth century. During the 1860’s Tippecanoe City had many wheelwrights working for the Grand Army of the Republic or the North in the Civil War. These wheelwrights hammered out wooden wheels for the cannon carriages, caissons, supply wagons and troop carriers. In 1869, after the war, John W. Ford built the building to house the Ford and Company Wheel Works employing many of the wheelwrights. The owners of the Ford Company were John Ford, Henry Darst, Jacob Rohrer, Edward Crane, Henry Hawver, Gerald Timmer, and William Crane.

In 1888 the Wheel Works Co. and the Tipp Furniture Co. (south Fifth St.) combined to form the Northern Manufacturing Co., maker of furniture. In 1891 the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railroad purchased land to run a spur line to the Northern Furniture Company.

After the 1913 flood, the Miami Conservancy District bought some land in 1918 from Northern Furniture Co. to build the levy behind the building. At that time T.C. Leonald was the president and E. L. Crane was secretary. In 1941, Tube Products purchased the building and made exhaust systems. The building was sold for $13,471 in 1941. Tube Products operated until 1970 when the building was sold and Ace Paper Products used the building. Kinnison Trucking Company leased the building from 1972 to 1978. During the 1970’s John Folkert used the building to make his Shopsmith products.

In 1980 Jerry Allen of Allen Foods bought the building and put in the Trophy Nut operations. Today Trophy Nut has a retail store. They also process and package their products in the building. The exterior of the 147-year-old building hasn’t changed much over the years.
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Tiny Teal

Owner & Designer
Karrie Platfoot
Learn more

We want to sincerely thank our Homeowners for opening their homes to us. We couldn’t do this without their hospitality and generosity!

MISSION STATEMENT

Downtown Tipp City Partnership (DTCP) is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization and a National Trust for Historic Preservation and Heritage Ohio organization. The DTCP is the leading advocate for downtown business and property owners. We directly serve the business owners, property owners, and residents of downtown Tipp City, but our work also impacts the surrounding comunity and visitors. A healthy, active, economically strong town cneter supports stable property values, good schools, and civic involvement throughout the City, not just in the downtown area.

ADDRESS

P. O. Box 626


Tipp City, Ohio 45371


Phone: 937-667-4499


Email: TippChristmas@gmail.com